Being Creative with Relationships

Creativity, even making an effort to be creative, means going where you haven’t been before. And that’s the beauty of creativity; discovery. In the context of relationships, it might mean doing and saying something you haven’t done or said before. Mark Twain said that “all life is an experiment and that the more we experiment, the broader and more meaningful are our experiences.”

That resonates with me because I like to experiment with ideas and people. Years back, I experimented with children’s behavior. My experiment in creating a positive environment enabled children to grow and achieve their potential. They were able to move on from being what they thought others wanted them to be and instead to be more themselves. I discovered that if children felt safe being themselves, they were also more willing to be open and receptive in their relationships with others. Experience has shown the ability to be authentic directly affects whether an individual will become more trusting and open—or more closed and restrictive.

I have always believed we are here for each other and for ourselves at the same time. While certain experiences bring us together, we still need to discover and experiment with what brings us greater awareness and appreciation of the person next to us. We all benefit when we create opportunities and experiences within our relationships to better understand and appreciate each other. In striving to keep our experiences positive, we grow from our authentic interactions with each other. Otherwise, we miss an opportunity for growth.

The challenge is that we are different and similar at the same time. Being able to experience and appreciate this is important. Indeed, the creative application of what I’ve often referred to as authentic dialogue plays an essential part in this.

Each of us has the potential to be more open and truer to ourselves. To be what others want us to be is a loss to all.

I am me to be————–So I choose being myself————–We both benefit.
Let me be myself———–Better for both, this is best———-Being you and me.

Sy

Another Story To Tell

Boo-Boo (Brutus) was our first dog. He was mostly Beagle at least in size and temperament, brown and black in marking, and very bright. This was obvious in how quickly he took to evidencing and learning certain behaviors and joining in as a member of our family, which soon included Cleo, a pure white and very productive cat in that she gave birth to 48 kittens. This was the way we lived until Heidi and Jeff joined us. Although we lived in tight quarters, to be sure, we all got along exceptionally well—many wonderful memories.


The story, for now, is about how Brutus entertained us. He would sit straight up in my arms and do numbers for us. If I asked him to multiply, divide, subtract or add, Brutus would do just that by barking the correct answer. For example, I would ask him to multiply 3×3, and he’d bark nine times. Or to divide, I’d say two into four, and he’d bark twice. It may sound like I was giving him cues, but not true. This incredible animal did what he did (almost everything) when he saw that something ought to be done. One example was bringing the morning paper to me. I never asked or trained him. He possessed intelligence that amazed.


When Heidi joined our family as a puppy, Brutus took on the role of mentor to Heidi. And Heidi (ultimately a huge German Shepard) came to adore her little friend. In fact, they were twins in the way they cooperated and communicated—Here’s an example. We bought a steak (a rare purchase at that time) for dinner. Lenette placed the steak carefully on the BBQ and left it for a few moments. Heidi and Brutus both knew that what we set on the BBQ was for us, and they would get whatever scraps were leftover. We never missed sharing food with them, so we never experienced prior “theft.” But it happened. With Boo Boo’s guidance, Heidi gently pulled the steak off the grill. Then, off in the corner of the yard, they indulged. Guilt may have oozed out of them, but the steak they still enjoyed. And so it goes.


Not as expected——–Things do not go as we want——-The steak our story.

Sy